Most students get overexcited or too desperate while applying for scholarship opportunities or grants. What they don’t understand is that an essential part for any scholarship opportunity is the application itself which determines your selection criteria. Your scholarship application is revealed and viewed to the selection committee of the college or university for the evaluation process.

Each year hundreds of applications are received and viewed by the selection committee to evaluate you as a potential candidate for their college program or not. However the method of selecting applicants can also be determined by the donor of the scholarship funds. Where on the other hand, the selection committee is made up of different senior faculty members and teachers who overlook the fairness and equality for all applications to see the best fit for their scholarship program. Many grants or scholarship programs can be offered to native students from another country of origin which are supported by other institutions. 

Keeping an Eye for Detail

There is always a tough competition between applicants. The key is to select an appropriate scholarship program based upon your achievements and skills and which is tailored down to your specific requirements. Google out any potential scholarship opportunities where you can log onto the college website and fill up the application. If selected, you would receive more information regarding your credentials, eligibility, disbursement and recognition events. It is always important to keep two or three options if you get rejected from the first application.

Preparing Your Scholarship Application and Essay

Give yourself time to prepare your scholarship application. Make sure that you read all the necessary guideline carefully and thoroughly. Prepare all your supporting documentation, degrees and certificates before time. When asked about ‘why you deserve this scholarship’, think clearly to answer the following questions

  • What you would achieve personally, professionally and academically through this scholarship
  • What is the level of your insight, aspiration and commitment for your selected program
  • What are your past achievements which are associated with the area of your study; academically, professionally and research wise

Review your application at least two to three times as your application is not just a piece of paper, it is a representation of yourself which would be viewed as an opportunity for your selection. Do not brag about yourself, try to convince others on how you would benefit the program and what makes you a better candidate for the scholarship. Make your application essay to the point and direct, nobody likes to read a boring essay, write as if your own voice is speaking through the essay.

Most questions are answered in the essay where you can also be asked to write about a problem that you faced and what did you do to overcome it. Don’t put your career goals in cliché statements and write reasons for wanting to attend the college with all your heart.

Last but not the least, you would be asked for recommendation letters as they are an important part of your application process. Ask your potential teachers to write intelligently about you and your academic accomplishments. Give them enough time to write about it, no rush. 

Review and decide well upon your scholarship program as once you do get selected then there is no turning back. Prove yourself worthwhile as this would be the first step to achieve success for your professional life.

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